The mystical story of Moses

On March 31, 2012, in A Life of Miracles, by MaggyW

The Jewish nation celebrates the Biblical story of the Exodus from Egypt as the festival of Passover. It was this festival that Jesus is said to have been celebrating at the last supper before his crucifixion.

The story of the Exodus is filled with Kabbalistic (mystical) symbolism but the crux of the story is the escape from slavery to freedom.

This is an allegory of the soul’s escape from the slavery of social and economic rules to a higher level of living.

The Israelites had moved to Egypt decades earlier in the time of Joseph when there was a famine in their homeland. At first they were well cared for and content but, after Joseph died, they became enslaved by the Egyptians. This is symbolic of the human ego ruling the self in everyday life. At first we are pleased to have a new job or a new relationship but, after a while, the old habits and the old ‘happiness set-point’ (the level of contentment we are used to) returns and we are back in the same situation as before.

It is worth mentioning that in mystical traditions, the word Israelite means “one who struggles with God” and is not necessarily associated with the Jewish nation.

Moses was born at a time when the Egyptian Pharaoh had ruled that all Hebrew boy babies were to be killed at birth because he feared that his slaves would revolt. That’s the same as the ego making us forget to exercise or diet or take that course that would give us further training.

Moses’ mother and sister hid him in a basket of rushes and floated him down the river where he was rescued by a princess of Egypt.

This represents the Soul having to be sent out from its natural home to be raised in an appropriate environment to fulfil the destiny for which it was born. In a way, the princess fulfils the role that a Godparent was originally meant to take. This is the first ‘mini-Exodus’ — there will be many in our lives and each one is meant to help us to step up, into our soul’s destiny where we can be of service to the World. Often they will feel like mental and emotional crucifixion as we are kicked away from the support we are used to, whether it’s our mother’s breast or our relationship or our work. Spiritual development is rarely comfortable…

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